Energy Bills On The Rise  

Posted by Big Gav

The SMH reports that electricity price rises will be even steeper next year, jumping from 7.5% to 19% - Energy bills rising to help us keep our cool. On the plus side, every time the price rises all forms of clean energy supply become more competitive.

THE average household electricity bill may be 15 per cent bigger next year, after the Australian Energy Regulator gave preliminary approval yesterday to another round of price rises.

NSW electricity retailers had already received permission to raise prices by as much as 10 per cent next July. In a draft decision yesterday, the regulator said they could raise fees for the network component of the bill too.

Under the change, EnergyAustralia, which mostly supplies households in central Sydney, the Central Coast and the Hunter, said the average bill would rise $2 a week. Integral Energy, which services western Sydney, the Southern Highlands and the Illawarra, could charge an additional $1.70 a week, and customers of Country Energy, in rural NSW, would pay an extra $1.96 a week on average.

The rises come on top of increases of almost 10 per cent for 2009-10 already granted by the state's Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal for the retail portion of electricity bills.

1 comments

Mine already went up 16% in SW FL this past yr and believe me that hurt.It Not enough credit is being given to the high gas prices this past year and it's serious damage on our economy and society. That one factor alone has caused serious stress in both individuals and businesses. A record number of homes and jobs have been lost as a direct result. And, while we are doing the happy dance around the lower prices at the pumps OPEC is announcing cuts to manipulate the prices upward again. We must get on with becoming energy independent.We can't take another year like this past. There is a wonderful new book out about the energy crisis and what it would take for America to become energy independent. It covers every aspect of oil, what it's uses are besides gasoline, our reserves, our depletion of it. Every type of alternative energy is covered and it's potential to replace oil. He even has proposed legislative agenda's that would be necessary to implement these changes along with time frames. This book is profoundly informative and our country needs to become more informed and move forward with becoming energy independent. Green technology would not only provide clean cheap energy it would create millions of badly needed new jobs. The Book is called The Manhattan Project of 2009 Energy Independence NOW. Our politicians all need to read this book. www.themanhattanprojectof2009.com

will hurt businesses as well that will pass it on to the consumer.

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