China's High-Speed-Rail Revolution  

Posted by Big Gav in

Technology Review has an article on China's growing high speed rail network - China's High-Speed-Rail Revolution.

China has begun operating what is, by several measures, the world's fastest rail line: a dedicated 968-kilometer line linking Wuhan, in the heart of central China, to Guangzhou, on the southeastern coast. In trials, the "WuGuang" line trains (locally built variants of Japan's Shinkansen and Germany's InterCity Express high-speed trains) clocked peak speeds of up to 394 kilometers per hour (or 245 miles per hour). They have also recorded an average speed of 312 kph in nonstop runs four times daily since the WuGuang's December 26 launch, slashing travel time from Wuhan to Guangzhou from 10.5 hours to less than three.

WuGuang's speed blows away the reigning champion: France's TGV, which runs from Lorraine to Champagne and averages 272 kph. It also bests China's first high-speed train, the Beijing-to-Tianjin trains that average 230 kph, as well as Shanghai's magnetically levitated airport shuttle trains that can hit 430 kph but average less than 251 kph.

Rail experts say the builders of the new WuGuang line deserve more bragging rights than the trains' European and Japanese designers.

"The high-speed rail technology implemented in China is not that much different from the TGV, Germany's ICE, and the Shinkansen," says Rongfang Liu, a rail expert at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark. What is notable, she and others say, is that unlike many high-speed lines that repurpose older tracks, this one was designed from the ground up for very high-speed operation over hundreds of kilometers. Bridges and tunnels, as well as the concrete bed beneath the track, have been designed to safely rocket passengers around, through, or over the natural and man-made obstacles that would otherwise force the trains to slow down.

Plenty more speedy lines are coming in China under an ambitious build-out initiated in 2006 by China's Ministry of Railways, and accelerated with government stimulus funds. A two-trillion-yuan ($293 billion) plan envisions 16,000 kilometers of dedicated high-speed rail lines connecting all of China's major cities by 2020. The first East-West segment--a link from Xi'an to Zhengzhou--could begin operating as early as this month, and work is underway to extend the Beijing-Tianjin line southward to Shanghai by 2012. WuGuang, meanwhile, is expected to expand northward to Beijing and South to Hong Kong by 2013. "Over the next five years there'll be more high-speed rail added in China than the rest of the world combined," says Keith Dierkx, director of IBM's Beijing-based Global Rail Innovation Center.

High-speed rail is seen as a clean way to boost the expansion of China's transportation system, according to Dierkx. Dedicated lines will help meet rail demand, which is expected to more than triple to five billion passengers per year by 2020. And building these lines is seen as preferable to further expanding reliance on imported oil for automobiles and airplanes. Dierkx says dedicated high-speed rail should also improve freight transportation by easing congestion on conventional rail lines.

Building fast lines requires civil engineering works on a massive scale. WuGuang has 625 bridges with a combined length of 362 kilometers, and 221 tunnels with a combined length of 177 kilometers, contributing to a total construction cost of 116 billion yuan ($17 billion). The 1,300-kilometer Beijing-to-Shanghai line will cost an estimated 221 billion yuan--more than the Three Gorges Dam hydroelectric project.

China has also commissioned the first segment of a large-scale HVDC link from Yannan to Guangdong, connecting inland hydro-power to coastal consumers - Siemens puts world’s first 800-kV high-voltage direct-current link into operation in China.
In late December 2009, Siemens Energy and the utility China Southern Power Grid put into operation the first pole of a HVDC system of enormous scale and magnitude: With a transmission capacity of 5000 megawatts (MW) und covering a distance of more than 1400 kilometers the Yunnan-Guangdong high-voltage direct-current transmission system (HVDC) recently is the world’s most powerful of its kind implemented. At the same time it is the first HVDC link operating at a transmission voltage of 800 kilovolts (kV). Siemens is thus setting new benchmarks in energy-efficient transmission of ecofriendly electricity. Commissioning of the second pole and thus startup of the entire system is scheduled for mid-2010.

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