Burn Up  

Posted by Big Gav in , , ,

I watched the first episode of the series Burn Up on (ABC) TV tonight and quite enjoyed it - Burn Up. Next episode is on next Sunday (for Australian viewers - British viewers got to watch it back in 2008).

From the oil fields of Saudi Arabia to the boardrooms of London, Burn Up is a two-part topical thriller set in the real-life context of climate change as oil company executives, environmental activists and politicians collide in the battle between economic success and ecological responsibility.

Starring Rupert Penry-Jones (Spooks, Whitechapel), Bradley Whitford (The West Wing), Neve Campbell (Party Of Five) and Marc Warren (Hustle), Burn Up is a potent mix of fiction and fact that will enlighten as much as entertain.

Tom McConnell (Rupert Penry-Jones) has just been made head of Arrow Oil, a hugely powerful and wildly profitable oil company. With a happy family and lucrative promotion, life couldn’t get any sweeter. But the assassination of six geologists working in the Saudi desert will turn Tom’s world upside down and Tom will slowly uncover a sinister side of business.

Always the company man, Tom is as loyal as they come and a staunch defender of the oil business, denying any link from the work of Arrow Oil to climate change. His charismatic best friend and oil lobbyist Mack (Bradley Whitford) helps confirm his convictions. But when a young Inuit, Mika (Sandrine Holt), alleges that Tom and Arrow Oil are ruining the lives of her people, with scant regard for the environmental impact of their work, Tom starts to question Arrow Oil.

Joined by his environmental advisor Holly (Neve Campbell), Tom takes a trip to Mika’s homeland and learns first-hand the growing climate change problem, a problem he can’t ignore any more. He also can’t ignore his growing attraction to Holly. But when Mack reveals that she is a spy in collaboration with environmentalists, Tom is stunned and starts to question who he can trust.

1 comments

It is always necessary to keep a balance between science and nature. For the survival of mankind it is always necessary that both these factors goes hand in hand. The rate with which global warming is increasing it is really shocking and need some required steps.

Post a Comment

Statistics

Locations of visitors to this page

blogspot visitor
Stat Counter

Total Pageviews

Ads

Books

Followers

Blog Archive

Labels

australia (615) global warming (419) solar power (392) peak oil (351) renewable energy (292) electric vehicles (245) wind power (190) ocean energy (165) csp (158) geothermal energy (144) solar thermal power (144) smart grids (140) tidal power (137) energy storage (136) oil (136) solar pv (136) coal seam gas (131) nuclear power (127) china (117) lng (116) iraq (113) geothermal power (112) green buildings (110) natural gas (110) agriculture (91) oil price (80) biofuel (78) wave power (73) smart meters (72) uk (69) coal (68) electricity grid (67) energy efficiency (64) google (58) bicycle (51) internet (51) big brother (49) shale gas (49) surveillance (49) food prices (48) tesla (42) thin film solar (42) biomimicry (40) canada (40) scotland (38) ocean power (37) politics (37) shale oil (37) new zealand (35) air transport (34) algae (34) water (34) concentrating solar power (33) arctic ice (32) queensland (32) saudi arabia (32) california (31) credit crunch (31) bioplastic (30) offshore wind power (30) population (30) cogeneration (28) geoengineering (28) batteries (26) drought (26) resource wars (26) woodside (26) bruce sterling (25) censorship (25) cleantech (25) ctl (23) carbon tax (22) economics (22) exxon (22) limits to growth (22) buckminster fuller (21) distributed manufacturing (21) iraq oil law (21) lithium (21) coal to liquids (20) indonesia (20) origin energy (20) brightsource (19) rail transport (19) ultracapacitor (19) santos (18) ausra (17) collapse (17) electric bikes (17) michael klare (17) atlantis (16) cellulosic ethanol (16) iceland (16) mapping (16) ucg (16) bees (15) concentrating solar thermal power (15) ethanol (15) geodynamics (15) lithium ion batteries (15) psychology (15) al gore (14) brazil (14) bucky fuller (14) carbon emissions (14) fertiliser (14) ambient energy (13) biodiesel (13) cities (13) investment (13) kenya (13) matthew simmons (13) public transport (13) biochar (12) chile (12) desertec (12) internet of things (12) otec (12) texas (12) victoria (12) big oil (11) cradle to cradle (11) energy policy (11) hybrid car (11) terra preta (11) tinfoil (11) toyota (11) amory lovins (10) antarctica (10) fabber (10) gazprom (10) goldman sachs (10) gtl (10) severn estuary (10) volt (10) afghanistan (9) alaska (9) biomass (9) carbon trading (9) distributed generation (9) esolar (9) four day week (9) fuel cells (9) jeremy leggett (9) methane hydrates (9) pge (9) sweden (9) arrow energy (8) eroei (8) fish (8) floating offshore wind power (8) guerilla gardening (8) linc energy (8) methane (8) nanosolar (8) natural gas pipelines (8) pentland firth (8) relocalisation (8) saul griffith (8) stirling engine (8) us elections (8) western australia (8) airborne wind turbines (7) bloom energy (7) boeing (7) bolivia (7) chp (7) climategate (7) copenhagen (7) scenario planning (7) vinod khosla (7) apocaphilia (6) ceramic fuel cells (6) cigs (6) futurism (6) jatropha (6) local currencies (6) nigeria (6) ocean acidification (6) somalia (6) t boone pickens (6) space based solar power (5) varanus island (5) garbage (4) global energy grid (4) kevin kelly (4) low temperature geothermal power (4) oled (4) tim flannery (4) v2g (4) club of rome (3) norman borlaug (2) peak oil portfolio (1)