Shell "New Lens" Scenarios 2013 - Mountains and Oceans  

Posted by Big Gav in , ,

The Harvard Business Review has an article on Shell's scenario planning practice over the years - Living in the Futures - going back to it's genesis in 1965 and chronicling the evolution of the practice over the years.

The authors of the article are a former Shell scenario planner and a former Shell executive who recently completed a history of scenario planning at the company after interviewing almost every surviving veteran of the operation, along with current and former top company executives. They identified the following principles that have been followed by scenario planners over the years:

  • Make It Plausible, Not Probable
  • Strike a Balance Between Relevant and Challenging
  • Tell Stories That Are Memorable Yet Disposable - You are trying to manipulate people into being open-minded.
  • Add Numbers to Narrative
  • Scenarios Open Doors
  • Manage Disagreement as an Asset
  • Fit into a Broader Strategic Management System

The 2013 scenarios were released in March, dubbed the "News lens Scenarios" (pdf), looking at 2 scenarios - "Mountains" and "Oceans".

With the world’s population headed toward 9 billion at mid-century and millions of people climbing out of poverty, global energy demand could increase by as much as 80% by 2050. That’s according to Shell’s latest scenarios, which look at trends in the economy, politics and energy in considering developments over the next half a century.

What might lie ahead 50 years from now… or even in 2100? We consider two possible scenarios of the future, taking a number of pressing global trends and issues and using them as “lenses” through which to view the world.

The scenarios provide a detailed analysis of current trends and their likely trajectory into the future. They dive into the implications for the pace of global economic development, the types of energy we use to power our lives and the growth in greenhouse gas emissions.

The scenarios also highlight areas of public policy likely to have the greatest influence on the development of cleaner fuels, improvements in energy efficiency and on moderating greenhouse gas emissions.

Mountains

The first scenario, labelled “mountains”, sees a strong role for government and the introduction of firm and far-reaching policy measures. These help to develop more compact cities and transform the global transport network. New policies unlock plentiful natural gas resources – making it the largest global energy source by the 2030s – and accelerate carbon capture and storage technology, supporting a cleaner energy system.

Oceans

The second scenario, which we call “oceans”, describes a more prosperous and volatile world. Energy demand surges, due to strong economic growth. Power is more widely distributed and governments take longer to agree major decisions. Market forces rather than policies shape the energy system: oil and coal remain part of the energy mix but renewable energy also grows. By the 2070s solar becomes the world’s largest energy source.

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